• 1st Floor, Namlex Chambers, 333 Independence Avenue, Windhoek
  • +264 61 231 151
slider slider slider
Society of Advocates of Namibia
Upholding the interest of Advocates in Namibia
Society of Advocates of Namibia
Administration of justice in the interest of the public
THE SOCIETY OF ADVOCATES OF NAMIBIA
NAMIBIAN BAR

The Namibian Bar constitutes a pool of expertise and specialisation, available to the public and the government, as those advocates, who are members of the Society of Advocates of Namibia, are legal practitioners, who have expertise in trial, motion, appellate, arbitration, advice and opinion work, in all matters involving Namibian and Southern African law.

The Namibian Bar

STATEMENTOF INTENT

The Bar identifies itself fully with and is committed to the values and ideals embodied in the Constitution of the Republic of Namibia. As a body of independent practitioners who act on a referral basis, the Bar is committed to providing specialised legal representation at fair fees to all persons who require those services. By providing this representation, as well as assisting with the protection of human rights and supporting access to justice for indigent persons as well as alternative dispute resolution, the Bar strives to serve all the people of Namibia.

more about us
about

Legal System

THE ROLE OF ADVOCATES IN THE NAMIBIAN LEGAL SYSTEM

The legal system affects everyone, be it in drawing up a will, buying a house, getting divorced or having to appear in a court of law. The legal profession is especially trained to assist all members of society in this regard.
Up to 1995 the legal profession in Namibia used to be divided into advocates (barristers), and attorneys (solicitors). No dual practice was permitted. Since the promulgation of the Legal Practitioner's Act, Act no. 15 of 1995, the previous division of the legal profession into advocates and attorneys was removed. Read More


ADVOCATES AND ATTORNEYS - WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE?

The legal system affects everyone, be it in drawing up a will, buying a house, getting divorced or having to appear in a court of law. The legal profession is especially trained to assist all members Read More

WHAT IS THE BAR ?

There are therefore two categories of legal practitioners in Namibia, that is legal practitioners practising with a Fidelity Fund Certificate, (sometimes also referred to as lawyers or attorneys) and advocates, legal practitioners exempted Read More

WHAT IS THE BAR COUNCIL?

Historically advocates have been organized into societies of advocates practising in the major centres of their countries. These societies are historically known as bars which are, in essence, fraternities of men and women, who practise Read More


WHAT DO ADVOCATES DO ?

Advocates are primarily experts in the art of presenting and arguing cases in court. Until 1995 only advocates had audience and the right to present cases in the higher courts such as Read More

WHY ARE ADVOCATES IMPORTANT?

Legal representation in the courts is a fundamental right of Namibians and all other litigants. It is vital that such representation should come from as broad a cross- section of Namibian society Read More

HOW DO I BECOME AN ADVOCATE?

The requirements for membership to the Namibian Bar are a recognised Bachelor of Laws degree, admission as a legal practitioner in terms of Act 15 of 1995 Read More

NEWS AND PRESS RELEASES

news
28 February 2018

PRESS STATEMENT ISSUED BY (SAN) ON THE ATTACK ON THE INDEPENDENCE OF THE JUDICIARY

The Deputy Judge-President of the High Court, Mr Justice Angula, handed down a recent judgment interdicting the implementation of various rulings of the Valuation Court relating to the payment of land tax.

Read More
news
01 January 20018

PRESS RELEASE BY THE SOCIETY OF ADVOCATES OF NAMIBIA
(“THE SOCIETY”)

The Society of Advocates of Namibia ("the Society") has noted certain public criticisms of judgments and judges of the High Court of Namibia ("the Court"). This is an unfortunate trend, moreover where such criticism is neither accurate nor fair

Read More
news
28 July 2016

PARLIAMENT’S CHALLENGE TO THE SEPARATION OF POWERS AND THE RULE OF LAW IN NAMIBIA

Last month the Namibian Supreme Court, in the De Wilde case, in interpreting Article 4 of the Namibian Constitution, ruled that a child born in Namibia to non-Namibian citizens would be a Namibian citizen by birth where the child’s father or mother was ordinarily .

Read More